FCN Investigates: What exactly are you paying for at the pump?

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- We are just weeks from the busy Thanksgiving travel season.

But, before you fill up for your trip the On Your Side team has three things you'll want to know before you hit the road. It's part of a First Coast News investigation.

At the gas station, every cent counts.

"I get pretty much what my car gives me," said Michael Bryce, as he filled up the car. "I get around $20 half a tank, $40 for a full tank, $5 for an eighth of a tank."

If you feel like something just isn't right, you might be on to something.

It is Anthony Davis' job to find out

He's one of the petroleum inspectors with the Florida Department of Agriculture.

"We want to make sure that consumers are getting what they're paying for," Davis said.

FCN's David Williams joined him at the Chevron station on New Kings Road for an inspection. Inspections are done at least every 12-14 months, says Davis.

Top 5 hottest jobs and how you can land one

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- Are you looking for work? If you are, keep the following story handy.

Like many people, 37-year-old Ty Harris of Jacksonville, has been looking for work.

"Off an on for about a year," Harris explained.

He's been doing freelance work in client and project management, but is looking for something more permanent, which is why he came to a job fair Monday.

He said the job market is tough, which makes it harder to help his family of two children.

"I've gotten a lot of 'You're over qualified,'" Harris said of his year-long job search.

FCN's David Williams asked Harris "What if we told you, we know what the top 5 most in-demand jobs are in Jacksonville?"

To that, Harris responded "I would be impressed and I would inquire what would that be?"

Mayor, officials' London trip costs taxpayers nearly $20,000 so far

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. - A First Coast News investigation shows the City of Jacksonville has spent nearly $20,000 on a week-long trip to Europe.

The investigation has also revealed that the cost will go up even higher once receipts from the trip are processed.

Right now, Mayor Alvin Brown, City Council President Bill Gulliford and Economic Development Chief Ted Carter are in London, England.

They are spending the week attending business meetings set up in part by Jaguars owner Shad Khan.

The game plan is to try and bring new, international business to the River City.

First Coast News has confirmed there are more than 20 different companies the city is meeting with. One of them is Deutsche Bank.

Leaders will also be attending the Jaguars game in London against the San Francisco 49ers at Wembley Stadium on Sunday.

First Coast News obtained multiple pages of travel documents from the city to conduct its investigation.

School zone no longer danger zone

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. - A potentially dangerous issue near Central Riverside Elementary School is now resolved thanks to a viewer who alerted First Coast News.

Allen Dunn, a Riverside resident, e-mailed us about a palm tree that had overgrown to the point it was covering a school zone speed limit sign.

"Oh, it's more than hidden. It's completely covered. I mean, it really took me searching to find the sign," Dunn said.

The sign sits on city property in the 2500 block of Ernest Street and requires drivers to go 15 miles per hour between 7:45 a.m. and 8:45 a.m. and 2:30 and 3:30 p.m.

The lower speed limit is a safety precaution because those are times of day when children might be present.

But Dunn's e-mail pointed out that palm leaves from the tree almost completely concealed the sign to oncoming drivers.

His concern is they would not know they were in a school zone.

Scammers target JEA customers

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- A phishing scam targeting JEA customers on the First Coast is on the rise this week.

According to JEA, scammers are calling people to say their service will be disconnected unless they purchase a Moneypak card. 

The phone caller then asks for the number for the card. 

There has been an increase in the last week in the scam calls, according to JEA. 

In an email to First Coast News a JEA spokesperson wrote:

JEA will notify customers should their service be at risk for disconnect for non pay via their bill, letter and automated call. JEA will take payments via website, phone, at the main office, tax collector office, Winn-Dixie or any of the JEA-approved stores found on jea.com.


Anyone who receives a call is asked to report the incident to JEA. 

Nonprofit's mission is 'Enroll America' in Obamacare

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- The Affordable Health Care Act, a.k.a. Obamacare is the law. If you're now uninsured, you must have health insurance by 2014. That said, the program's deadlines, the various plans and who is eligible have left many confused.

"There is a lot of people who don't understand what their options are," said Tony Penna.

Penna, a former insurance executive is with Enroll America, a privately funded nonprofit that is trying to spread the word about the Affordable Care Act.

"The biggest challenge is how many people in Duval, Clay Nassau and St. Johns who don't have insurance," said Penna, "There about 300,000 people."

Enroll America staffers are now knocking on doors, making calls to spread the word out.

"About 39 percent of the people in Florida who are eligible for insurance think that the law has been repealed," he said, "It has not been repealed."

Local truckers unaware of rolling protest in D.C.

JACKSONVILLE,Fla. -- At the truck stops near Baldwin and U.S. 301 it was exceptionally busy. Truckers leaving Interstate 10 to buy much needed fuel or to take a break from the road.

Trey Hervey, a six year veteran, was on the way to North Carolina and needed a break.

"I'm not an Independent," said Hervey. "But I want to be."

Hervey loves to talk about the industry and its challenges, but when it came to the rolling protest in the nation's capital he had no knowledge.

"I don't know anything about it," he said.

And at this truck stop, a microcosm of a tight knit community, few trucks knew what was taking place near Washington D.C.

The rolling protest was to challenge the Obama administration and Congressional leaders over the government shutdown. It was to be a strong statement about America's frustration with its government.