Environment

Atlantic Snook Harvest Closes Dec. 15; Catch and Release Still OK

The recreational harvest of snook will close in all Atlantic coastal and inland waters, including Lake Okeechobee and the Kissimmee River, beginning on Dec. 15.  The annual winter harvest season closure of snook in these areas, which normally ends on Feb. 1, has been extended until Sept. 1, 2011, by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) due to the prolonged cold weather that impacted snook in Florida earlier this year.

Get to Know the “Five P’s” of Cold Weather Safety

Florida Division of Emergency Management officials are again urging all residents and visitors throughout Florida to prepare for temperatures near or below the freezing mark tonight through Wednesday morning. The National Weather Service has issued a Hard Freeze Warning for all of North and Central Florida, and also for Glades, Hendry and Palm Beach counties.  A Freeze Warning has also been issued for the rest of South Florida. The entire state is under either a Wind Chill Advisory or Warning, depending on the location.
 
According to Division of Emergency Management Director David Halstead. “It is vital that all residents and visitors remember the “Five P’s” of cold weather safety: Protect People, Protect Plants, Protect Pets, Protect Exposed Pipes, and Practice Fire Safety.”

Red Snapper Fishing is Prohibited in South Atlantic Federal Waters

NOAA Fisheries Service extended the prohibition of commercial and recreational fishing for red snapper in all federal waters of North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and the Atlantic coast of Florida.  It is illegal to fish for, possess, or harvest red snapper from these waters.

Cold Weather May Lead to Fish Kills

Cold Weather May Lead to Fish Kills

As temperatures drop in Florida, the number of cold-related fish kills is likely to increase. Chilly winter temperatures can lead to fish die-offs in Florida’s marine habitats, rivers and lakes.

The good news is that these events are natural occurrences and typically do not cause permanent damage to the ecosystem or to fish populations. In some cases they are even beneficial, in that they help limit the spread of invasive, exotic species.

FWC Wants Public's Input About More Daylight Alligator Hunting

FWC Wants Public's Input About More Daylight Alligator Hunting

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) wants to know what Floridians think about providing more daylight-hunting hours to alligator hunters. The public can comment via an online survey.

St. Johns River Foam - It's Back!

St. Johns River Foam - It's Back!

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- The foam found floating in the St. Johns River has returned.

It turns out that the foam never really went away, according to Riverkeeper Neil Armingeon.

He got reports of the foam in July and August, but said it seemed to go away for a while. But more reports started pouring in for some areas along the river in November.

Now, Armingeon said, the foam is back.

In July, the state Department of Environmental Protection ruled that the foam did not contain cyanuric acid, a chemical that's normally used to clean swimming pools.

DEP investigators remain unsure of what is causing the foam.

Jacksonville Arboretum & Gardens Florida Urban and Community Forestry Grant

November 23, 2010 The Jacksonville Arboretum & Gardens, Inc. significantly enhanced it’s outreach to the community with the aid of the Florida Urban and Community Forestry Grant Program during 2010.  These funds were made available to organizations and municipalities to develop or enhance their urban and community forestry programs.